RIBA Award

Greenwich Gateway Pavilions, London | Marks Barfield Architects

The Greenwich Gateway Pavilions play an important role in an area undergoing huge transformation. The Pavilions are a statement of intent, signalling the quality and character of the place the peninsula is to become. The building is part of a bigger landscape: it defines the southern edge of the Peninsular Square, and forms a gateway to Central Park, and the major residential developments beyond.

The accommodation is housed in two curved glass pavilions. The curved and facetted glass skin to the pavilions has a high-performance specification. Its transparency and reflectivity is determined by the orientation of the glass around the building. The north elevation is transparent to invite people into the art gallery and marketing suite. The remaining areas of the glazing is highly reflective, to control solar gain and reflect the surrounding landscape.

A floating canopy above the pavilions forms a shelter for frequent artistic and community events on the peninsula. The curved canopy has a patinated brass edge, which forms the last ripple emanating from the O2 Arena. The glazed pavilions are visually connected, by an arrangement of curved tubes fixed to the underside of the canopy. These tubes make a magnetic field pattern, which link back to and clad the central cores of the two pavilions. The Kalzip roof covering to the top of the canopy has a very appealing compound curved form, created by a vector ‘Revit’ conversations between architect and sub-contractor. Rooftop terraces give visitors 360 degree views across London. Even the washed pebbles on the edge of the roof terrace have been carefully colour co-ordinated in radiating arch gradations.

The buildings were built and fitted out in record time: 18 months from appointment. The Gateway Pavilions are sculptural, distinctive, and form a well-composed gateway to the new residential development in this new and vibrant district on the Greenwich Peninsula.

Source: RIBA